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Art today: from globalization to nations, settlement and nomadism

Saturday November 19th 2011 – Teatro alle Tese, Arsenale, 3 p.m.
Art Today: from Globalization to Nations, Settlement to Nomadism
Speakers: Nicolas Bourriaud, Marta Kuzma and Gianfranco Maraniello
 
Nicolas Bourriaud (France, 1965) is a curator and art critic. From 2000 to 2006 he co-directed the Palais de Tokio in Paris and in 2009 he curated the Tate Triennial in London.
Marta Kuzma (USA, 1971) is a curator and scholar of contemporary art; since 2005 she has directed the OCA – Office for Contemporary Art Norway in Oslo, Norway.
Gianfranco Maraniello (1971) is a curator and art critic. Director of the MAMbo – Museum of Modern Art in Bologna, he has been the curator for many exhibitions, in particular in the Palazzo delle Papesse in Siena and at the MACRO in Rome. He has written regularly for magazines such as Flash Art, from 1993 to 2001, and BT (Japan) from 2000 to 2003.
 
Bice Curiger, “ILLUMInations”, text from the catalogue of the Art Biennale 2011, Marsilio Editori
“The Venice Biennale these days is the venue where different groups of artists, whether firmly resident in some place in the world or migrant and itinerant, can meet and intermingle. La Biennale provides an arena of negotiation to ascertain what future role should be assumed by culture and art in a globalized world, which values ought to be safeguarded and which jettisoned. Since culture is not a static entity, these matters are in pressing and vital need of clarification if we are to keep art and culture from descending into a uniform, featureless mash”.
 
Nicolas Bourriaud, Radicant : pour une esthétique de la globalisation, Denoël 2009
"The multiculturalist version of cultural diversity must be placed in question, not in favor of a systematic universalism or a new modernist Esperanto, but rather in the context of a new modern moment based on generalized translation, the form of wandering, an ethics of precariousness and a heterochronic vision of history.”