fbpx Biennale Danza 2020 | Noé Soulier - Portrait of Frédéric Tavernini
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Noé Soulier - Portrait of Frédéric Tavernini


Choreography: Noé Soulier
Dancer: Frédéric Tavernini
Lighting:Victor Burel
Music:Matteo Fargion, performed live by Noé Soulier (piano)
Music:Grand adage, Act III from Swan Lake by Tchaikovsky; Prélude Op. 28, n. 20 by Chopin
Performer:Noé Soulier
Production: ND Productions (Paris)
Executive producer:Centre national de danse contemporaine CNDC (Angers)
Co-production:CN D Centre national de la danse, Pantin (FR)
Supported by:Direction Régionale des Affaires Culturelles d’Île-de-France – Ministère de la Culture et de la Communication au titre de l’aide à la structuration
Note:Noé Soulier is the director of the CNDC of Angers. The CNDC of Angers is subsidized by the Ministry of Culture – DRAC des Pays de la Loire, the city of Angers, the Region Pays de la Loire, and the Department Maine et Loire
Note:This work extends the research initiated in the project 7 Dialogues directed by Matteo Fargion and produced by Dance On Ensemble

Description

Tall, strapping, mature, sculpted, tattooed, Frédéric Tavernini, who has danced for Maurice Béjart, Trisha Brown, Mats Ek, William Forsythe and Angelin Preljocaj, occupies the stage with breadth, clarity, concentration, precision; he is revealed, in his life experience and current body, between memories and visions, to the rhythmic notes of a piano that softly touches Stravinsky, Hindemith, Tchaikovsky, Chopin. Dance in numbered episodes, in soft allusive batches, with the intensity of a sincere inner contemplation, cold in its control but certainly not in the emotional materials that he shapes with the length of his arms and his large expressive hands, under the eyes of an empathic observer such as Noé Soulier, choreo-philosopher-pianist.

Noé Soulier

“The experience of our bodily actions, whether in the present moment or in our memory of them, is always fragmentary.
It is this fragmentary dimension of the bodily experience that I try to convey through movement. I rely for this on practical goals that we all know, such as avoiding, hitting, throwing or catching. These goals are diverted from their initial function. By removing what makes these everyday actions familiar, I try to reveal the strangeness and elusiveness of the experience of our own body”.


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Biennale Danza
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